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Joe Biden’s potential victory is reviving the hunt for one of Washington’s biggest white whales: immigration legislation, the Hill reports.

Already, several Republican senators are pointing to immigration as one area they hope to compromise over in what is expected to be a divided government next year.

“I think that would be a good thing to do,” Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) said about the potential for what he called immigration reform in the upcoming Congress.

”The challenge is you’ve got to get the votes, but that to me is one of my biggest disappointments in my time in the Senate, our inability to get that done,” Cornyn said, adding that he would “try to be part of that effort” if the topic comes back up.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, who made his immigration stances known through the Gang of Eight bill during the Obama Administration, stated during a recent press call that he foresees room for deals between Republicans and Biden on several issues, and “there may be some things we can do on immigration. You know, you got the Dreamers hanging out there.”

”I will be willing to work with the Biden administration, if he wins — and I’m not conceding that he will — in ways to make the country stronger,” Graham said, adding that Biden would have to decide if he wants to cut deals with Republicans.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, who is expected to chair the Judiciary Committee if Republicans keep control of the Senate, needing to win at least one of the two run-off Senate races in Georgia, didn’t rule out compromising on immigration but warned it would depend on the parameters, which he said would need to be “somewhere in between” extremes on both sides.

“It’s kind of a case of the extreme points of view — like people who think we can load up 12 million people and get them out of the country; if they want to do that, they can’t be a part of it. And for the people who want people to be citizens yesterday, they can’t be a part of it,” Grassley explained.

Over the last couple of years the Senate has come close to what some would call “Comprehensive Immigration Reform,” a timeworn tag line that has had a large resurgence with Beltway elites. Unfortunately for the American people, Sen. Grassley’s assessment is true with each extreme continually moving the goalposts on what “immigration reform” actually means.

The Hill reports:

Now, even if Democrats are able to force a 50-50 tie by flipping two Georgia seats in runoff elections in January, they would be well short of the 60 votes needed to pass a deal.”

The uphill battle in Congress has open-border and big business advocates urging Biden to make drastic changes to the system through executive action, including rolling back Trump orders.

Biden is expected to quickly revive the DACA program, end the Trump administration’s travel ban from countries who are known funders of international terrorism, and end the construction of effective border barriers. He is even reportedly eyeing a freeze on deportations to give his administration time to issue new guidance for immigration agents. Biden also announced late last week that he would dramatically increase the refugee cap.

Even if Trump were to exit the White House, hope is not lost, there are still several Senators and a growing number of House Republicans who understand the true impact of uncontrolled mass immigration, and disastrous policies like zero-sum amnesties. Sens. like Tom Cotton, Josh Hawley, Ted Cruz, and David Perdue were some of the biggest supporters of President Trump’s push to reduce legal immigration protecting an untold number of American jobs.

Even some in the media continue to fight against the devastating impact Congress’s forced population growth has had on every aspect of the economy, Tucker Carlson, for example, remonstrated Graham for his earlier comments, calling out the Senators apparent willingness to “sell out his voters with an amnesty deal.”

The Hill reached out to Sen. Ted Cruz, asking him about the potential of making an immigration deal with a Biden administration. The Senator seemed certain that any Democrat immigration plan would simply try to enact an amnesty.

When asked if he thought it was a mistake for his colleagues to even open the door on such policies, Cruz prudently replied, “Yes.”

For the complete story, please visit The Hill.

Updated: Tue, Dec 1st 2020 @ 12:50pm EST