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The United States Justice Department released today that Facebook “intentionally” discriminated against U.S. workers and hired foreign guest workers instead, even going as far as actively trying to deter well-qualified Americans from applying, the culmination of two years of investigative work on behalf of the department.

The DOJ said their investigation began two years ago when Facebook filed an application with the Labor Department to hire a foreign worker as an “art director,” a role that requires a bachelor’s degree and two years of experience. Other positions included in the 2,600 applications in question were comprised of software jobs as well as “non-technical positions.”

The DOJ stated in their immigration court complaint that for most of its jobs, the social media-based tech giant abides by the law, but in cases when a foreign worker is already employed on a temporary visa and seeks a permanent job, Facebook locks out any other candidates.

Assistant Attorney General Eric Dreiband explained in the complaint:

Facebook then implements a recruitment process intentionally designed to deter U.S. workers from applying. Facebook does not advertise the positions on its website, does not accept applications online, and requires candidates to mail in their applications.

Not surprisingly, Facebook often gets zero applications for these advertised positions. And even when U.S. workers do apply, Facebook will not consider them for the advertised positions.

Corporations sponsoring workers for H-1B visas are required to show as part of the federal application process that they could not find any qualified American workers to fill the job.

Facebook, who shares its founder with FWD.us, one of the nation’s largest open border lobbying groups continually pushing for expanded uncontrolled mass immigration refused to respond to a request for comment, reports the Washington Times.

The workers in question were in the U.S. on H-1B visas, which are supposed to be reserved for foreigners with exceptional skills, and can not, by law, be used to discriminate against American workers. Unsurprisingly, tech firms are among the largest users of H-1B visas.

“H-1B workers are temporary, but they can apply to convert to a permanent position and become lawful permanent residents. The Justice Department says Facebook created a recruitment process that guaranteed the temporary workers the permanent jobs, locking Americans and other permanent legal residents out,” says the Washington Times article.

The jobs had an average salary of $156,000, and the Justice Department is seeking back pay on behalf of U.S. workers denied jobs and civil fines, the government said.

For the complete article, please visit the Washington Times.

Updated: Thu, Dec 17th 2020 @ 4:45pm EST