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Pres. Obama’s 2012 executive amnesty, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), still approves 93% of its applications, which may impact the Supreme Court’s decision on his broader executive amnesty, DAPA. The two executive actions are very similar and according to the Washington Examiner, the Supreme Court could easily use the performance of DACA to determine the future impact of DAPA.

By Dec. 2015 around 715,000 DACA applications had been approved while only 55,000 were rejected, mostly due to fraudulent information. Judge Hanen, the judge who first initiated the injunction against DAPA, and the majority of the Fifth Circuit Court, who upheld the injunction, said that the high approval rate shows that Pres. Obama is trying to write new policy and not just issue priority guidelines to carry out existing laws.

“It tells me that they’re rubber-stamping DACA applications. Any program that four years after its initiation is still approving 93 percent of applicants is a program that doesn’t have very high standards,” said Mark Krikorian, Executive Director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

DACA grants protection from deportation to any illegal alien 30 years or younger who can prove they came to the U.S. at a young age. The executive action has granted nearly 600,000 “Dreamers” amnesty and allows some of the illegal aliens to gain work permits.

DAPA is a broader amnesty that would allow around 5 million illegal aliens access to work permits and social security cards, which would qualify them for other state and federal benefits including welfare. DAPA was put on hold last February after Texas and 25 other states filed a lawsuit against the executive action. The injunction has been upheld by the Fifth Circuit Court that said DAPA would affect more than just immigration enforcement but would actually change the status of illegal aliens.

The Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on April 18th and could issue a ruling by the end of June.

Read more on this story at The Washington Times.

Updated: Tue, Apr 12th 2016 @ 1:20pm EDT