S. 2435: 

Defend America Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

S. 2435, the Defend America Act of 2015, would halt the resettlement of refugees from Syria or Iraq. It would also require the Department of Homeland Security to send information on refugees to the states before being resettled.

H.R. 4143: 

Terrorist Refugee Infiltration Prevention Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4143, the Terrorist Refugee Infiltration Prevention Act of 2015, would halt the resettlement of refugees from countries that contain terrorist controlled areas unless certified by the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security, the FBI, and the Director of National Intelligence.

H.R. 4074: 

H.R. 4074

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4074 would halt all refugee resettlement until both chambers of Congress passed a joint resolution. The bill would also require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a report to Congress each year detailing the nationality of resettled refugees.

H.R. 4044: 

H.R. 4044

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4044, would halt refugee resettlement of foreign nationals from Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Afghanistan or whose last known residence was in one of those countries.

H.R. 4025: 

H.R. 4025

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4025 would halt refugee resettlement of foreign nationals from Syria or whose last known residence was Syria. Resettlement would not restart until Congress passed a joint resolution.

H.R. 3573: 

Refugee Resettlement Oversight and Security Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 3573, the Refugee Resettlement Oversight and Security Act of 2015, would require Congress to pass a joint resolution each year approving the number of refugees resettled in the United States each year. This would likely reduce the resettlement of refugees into the United States by requiring greater Congressional oversight.

H.R. 4218: 

H.R. 4218

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4218 would halt all refugee resettlement until both the President and the Department of Homeland Security provides reports to Congress detailing the program's costs and procedures and a joint resolution is passed through Congress.

H.R. 52: 

Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R.52, the Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2015, would grant amnesty to 11 million illegal alien living in the United States. The legislation would also double the caps in chain migration categories, double the visa lottery, grant amnesty to foreign citizens who currently have Temporary Protected Status, and repeal any bans on funding for sanctuary cities. The legislation does include some improvements to border security.

H.R. 1149: 

Protection of Children Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 1149, the Protection of Children Act of 2015, would remove the requirement that only UACs from contiguous countries receive expedited removal. In addition, children are no longer required to make their own independent decision to withdraw their applications for admission, and immigration officers who determine such children are inadmissible may withdraw their applications and return them to their home countries. The transfer time of UACs to HHS is extended to allow for review, and various improvements are made to the SIJ visa and asylum programs.

H.R. 1153: 

Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 1153, the Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2015, represents one of the most thorough responses to the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) at the Southwest border. Aside from repealing the requirements that resulted in UACs from contiguous countries receiving differing treatment than those from noncontiguous countries, this bill requires immigration officers to order all illegal entrants removed upon screening, absent an asylum claim. In order to encourage cooperation with return, foreign countries who resist repatriation will face cuts to foreign assistance.

S. 2619: 

Children Returning on an Expedited and Safe Timeline Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 2619, the Children Returning on an Expedited and Safe Timeline Act, would attempt to address the surge at the Southwest border by redefining undocumented alien children (UAC). Unfortunately, in doing so, it actually expands the definition to include all children who cross the border without a parent or legal guardian. Under current law, a UAC must not have a parent or legal guardian inside the U.S. Therefore, such an expansion would place an enormous number of children who were otherwise ineligible through the UAC process.

H.R. 5143: 

Protection of Children Act of 2014

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 5143, the Protection of Children Act of 2014, would take excellent steps to resolve the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) along the Southwest border. First, it removes the requirement that only UACs from contiguous countries receive expedited removal. In addition, children are no longer required to make their own independent decision to withdraw their applications for admission, and immigration officers who determine such children are inadmissible may withdraw their applications and return them to their home countries.

H.R. 5137: 

Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2014

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 5137, the Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2014, represents one of the most thorough responses to the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) at the Southwest border. Aside from repealing the requirements that resulted in UACs from contiguous countries receiving differing treatment than those from noncontiguous countries, this bill requires immigration officers to order all illegal entrants removed upon screening, absent an asylum claim. In order to encourage cooperation with return, foreign countries who resist repatriation will face cuts to foreign assistance.

H.R. 5163: 

H.R. 5163

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 5163 would focus on addressing the increased influx of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) on the Southwest border. First and foremost, it removes the distinction between UACs from contiguous and noncontiguous countries, then requires those who are screened and do not qualify are returned within 72 hours. Various improvements are made to the system for processing UACs, including a new requirement that they are to remain in Border Patrol custody until voluntary departure, removal, or granting of legal status.

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