S. 2435: 

Defend America Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Sen. Mark Kirk [R-IL] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

S. 2435, the Defend America Act of 2015, would halt the resettlement of refugees from Syria or Iraq. It would also require the Department of Homeland Security to send information on refugees to the states before being resettled.

S. 2145: 

Middle East Refugee Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2016

Sponsored by:  Sen. Lindsey Graham [R-SC] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 2145, the Middle East Refugee Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2016, would provide funding to increase the number of refugees resettled in the United States each year from an average of 70,000 to 100,000 per year.

H.R. 4143: 

Terrorist Refugee Infiltration Prevention Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Rep. Ron DeSantis [R-FL6] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4143, the Terrorist Refugee Infiltration Prevention Act of 2015, would halt the resettlement of refugees from countries that contain terrorist controlled areas unless certified by the Departments of Defense and Homeland Security, the FBI, and the Director of National Intelligence.

H.R. 4074: 

H.R. 4074

Sponsored by:  Rep. Austin Scott [R-GA8] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4074 would halt all refugee resettlement until both chambers of Congress passed a joint resolution. The bill would also require the Secretary of Homeland Security to submit a report to Congress each year detailing the nationality of resettled refugees.

H.R. 4048: 

Syrian Refugee Verification and Safety Act

Sponsored by:  Rep. Garret Graves [R-LA6] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4048, the Syrian Refugee Verification and Safety Act, would halt refugee resettlement of foreign nationals from Syria or whose last known residence was Syria until the executive branch took several actions and Congress certifies the actions taken.

H.R. 4044: 

H.R. 4044

Sponsored by:  Rep. Curtis “Curt” Clawson [R-FL19] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4044, would halt refugee resettlement of foreign nationals from Syria, Iraq, Libya, Yemen, Afghanistan or whose last known residence was in one of those countries.

H.R. 4030: 

To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide that refugees may not be resettled in any State where the governor of that State has taken any action formally disapproving of the resettlement of refugees in that State, and for other purposes.

Sponsored by:  Rep. Steven Palazzo [R-MS4] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

To amend the Immigration and Nationality Act to provide that refugees may not be resettled in any State where the governor of that State has taken any action formally disapproving of the resettlement of refugees in that State, and for other purposes.

H.R. 4025: 

H.R. 4025

Sponsored by:  Rep. Dennis Ross [R-FL15] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4025 would halt refugee resettlement of foreign nationals from Syria or whose last known residence was Syria. Resettlement would not restart until Congress passed a joint resolution.

H.R. 3573: 

Refugee Resettlement Oversight and Security Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Rep. Michael McCaul [R-TX10] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 3573, the Refugee Resettlement Oversight and Security Act of 2015, would require Congress to pass a joint resolution each year approving the number of refugees resettled in the United States each year. This would likely reduce the resettlement of refugees into the United States by requiring greater Congressional oversight.

H.R. 4218: 

H.R. 4218

Sponsored by:  Rep. Marsha Blackburn [R-TN7] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4218 would halt all refugee resettlement until both the President and the Department of Homeland Security provides reports to Congress detailing the program's costs and procedures and a joint resolution is passed through Congress.

H.R. 3314: 

Resettlement Accountability National Security Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Rep. Brian Babin [R-TX36] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 3314, the Resettlement Accountability National Security Act of 2015, would immediately suspend all refugee resettlement until the Government Accountability Office can assess its costs to state and local municipalities and potential national security threats.

H.R. 52: 

Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee [D-TX18] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R.52, the Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2015, would grant amnesty to 11 million illegal alien living in the United States. The legislation would also double the caps in chain migration categories, double the visa lottery, grant amnesty to foreign citizens who currently have Temporary Protected Status, and repeal any bans on funding for sanctuary cities. The legislation does include some improvements to border security.

H.R. 1149: 

Protection of Children Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Rep. John Carter [R-TX31] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 1149, the Protection of Children Act of 2015, would remove the requirement that only UACs from contiguous countries receive expedited removal. In addition, children are no longer required to make their own independent decision to withdraw their applications for admission, and immigration officers who determine such children are inadmissible may withdraw their applications and return them to their home countries. The transfer time of UACs to HHS is extended to allow for review, and various improvements are made to the SIJ visa and asylum programs.

H.R. 1153: 

Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2015

Sponsored by:  Rep. Jason Chaffetz [R-UT3] in the 114th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 1153, the Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2015, represents one of the most thorough responses to the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) at the Southwest border. Aside from repealing the requirements that resulted in UACs from contiguous countries receiving differing treatment than those from noncontiguous countries, this bill requires immigration officers to order all illegal entrants removed upon screening, absent an asylum claim. In order to encourage cooperation with return, foreign countries who resist repatriation will face cuts to foreign assistance.

S. 2619: 

Children Returning on an Expedited and Safe Timeline Act

Sponsored by:  Sen. John McCain [R-AZ] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 2619, the Children Returning on an Expedited and Safe Timeline Act, would attempt to address the surge at the Southwest border by redefining undocumented alien children (UAC). Unfortunately, in doing so, it actually expands the definition to include all children who cross the border without a parent or legal guardian. Under current law, a UAC must not have a parent or legal guardian inside the U.S. Therefore, such an expansion would place an enormous number of children who were otherwise ineligible through the UAC process.

H.R. 5143: 

Protection of Children Act of 2014

Sponsored by:  Rep. John Carter [R-TX31] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 5143, the Protection of Children Act of 2014, would take excellent steps to resolve the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) along the Southwest border. First, it removes the requirement that only UACs from contiguous countries receive expedited removal. In addition, children are no longer required to make their own independent decision to withdraw their applications for admission, and immigration officers who determine such children are inadmissible may withdraw their applications and return them to their home countries.

H.R. 5137: 

Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2014

Sponsored by:  Rep. Jason Chaffetz [R-UT3] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 5137, the Asylum Reform and Border Protection Act of 2014, represents one of the most thorough responses to the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) at the Southwest border. Aside from repealing the requirements that resulted in UACs from contiguous countries receiving differing treatment than those from noncontiguous countries, this bill requires immigration officers to order all illegal entrants removed upon screening, absent an asylum claim. In order to encourage cooperation with return, foreign countries who resist repatriation will face cuts to foreign assistance.

H.R. 5163: 

H.R. 5163

Sponsored by:  Rep. Bill Cassidy [R-LA6] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 5163 would focus on addressing the increased influx of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) on the Southwest border. First and foremost, it removes the distinction between UACs from contiguous and noncontiguous countries, then requires those who are screened and do not qualify are returned within 72 hours. Various improvements are made to the system for processing UACs, including a new requirement that they are to remain in Border Patrol custody until voluntary departure, removal, or granting of legal status.

S. 2632: 

S. 2632

Sponsored by:  Sen. David Vitter [R-LA] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

S. 2632 would address the increased influx of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) on the Southwest border. First and foremost, it removes the distinction between UACs from contiguous and noncontiguous countries, then requires those who are screened and do not qualify are returned within 72 hours. Various improvements are made to the system for processing UACs, including a new requirement that they are to remain in Border Patrol custody until voluntary departure, removal, or granting of legal status.

S. 2611: 

Helping Unaccompanied Minors and Alleviating National Emergency (HUMANE) Act

Sponsored by:  Sen. John Cornyn [R-TX] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 2611, the Helping Unaccompanied Minors and Alleviating National Emergency (HUMANE) Act, would address the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) on the Southwest border, but would actually make the situation much worse. Though the distinction between UACs from Mexico and other countries is removed, it exposes all of them to a complicated process which would further delay returning the children to their countries of origin.

H.R. 5114: 

Helping Unaccompanied Minors and Alleviating National Emergency (HUMANE) Act

Sponsored by:  Rep. Henry Cuellar [D-TX28] in the 113th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 5114, the Helping Unaccompanied Minors and Alleviating National Emergency (HUMANE) Act, would address the surge of unaccompanied alien children (UACs) on the Southwest border, but would actually make the situation much worse. Though the distinction between UACs from Mexico and other countries is removed, it exposes all of them to a complicated process which would further delay returning the children to their countries of origin.

H.R. 4300: 

Family Unity and Employment Opportunity Immigration Act of 1990

Sponsored by:  Rep. Bruce Morrison [D-CT3, 1983-1990] in the 101st congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 4300 was a bill to radically increase annual immigration numbers by removing or increasing limits in most immigration categories. As well, H.R. 4300 created the diversity visa lottery. Traditional American immigration had averaged around 250,000 a year until the 1980s when it dramatically rose to around 500,000. Largely as a result of H.R. 4300, annual legal immigration has risen to around 1,000,000 (one million) a year.

S. 358: 

Immigration Act of 1990

Sponsored by:  Sen. Edward “Ted” Kennedy [D-MA, 1962-2009] in the 101st congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 358 was a bill to radically increase annual immigration numbers by removing or increasing limits in most immigration categories. As well, S. 358 created the diversity visa lottery. Traditional American immigration had averaged around 250,000 a year until the 1980s when it dramatically rose to around 500,000. Largely as a result of S. 358, annual legal immigration has risen to around 1,000,000 (one million) a year.

H.R. 3862: 

Immigration Moratorium Act of 1994

Sponsored by:  Rep. Robert Stump [R-AZ3, 1977-2002] in the 103rd congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 3862 would have cut legal immigration from around one million to below 300,000 a year -- near the traditional American level of immigration. It also would have eliminated one of the major incentives for illegal immigration by halting the granting of U.S. citizenship to babies born to illegal-alien mothers in the United States. The House leadership did not bring the bill to a vote.

H.R. 3320: 

Immigration Stabilization Act of 1993

Sponsored by:  Rep. James Bilbray [D-NV1, 1987-1994] in the 103rd congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R.3320 was the first comprehensive immigration reduction legislation to be introduced in the House since the 1920s. It would have cut legal immigration from around one million to just under 400,000 a year by reducing chain migration, cutting the number of employment-based green cards, reducing refugee and asylee admissions, eliminating the visa lottery, and boosting enforcement.

H.R. 4934: 

Immigration Reduction Act of 1994

Sponsored by:  Rep. Bill Archer [R-TX7, 1971-2000] in the 103rd congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4934, the Immigration Reduction Act, would cut legal immigration -- by reducing chain migration, ending the visa lottery, capping refugees and asylees, eliminating unnecessary worker visas, and ending birthright citizenship -- from around 1 million to around 320,000 a year, reducing U.S. population growth by about 5.8 million over a 10-year period.

H.R. 2202: 

Immigration Control and Financial Responsibility Act of 1996

Sponsored by:  Rep. Lamar Smith [R-TX21] in the 104th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 2202, the Immigration in the National Interest Act of 1995, was a large omnibus bill designed to reform the entire immigration system. The legal immigration reforms it included were based on the bi-partisan Barbara Jordan Commission's recommendations for cutting the major links of family-chain migration and protecting American workers from further wage depression. The bill would have eliminated the categories for adult children and siblings and limited that for parents of adults.

H.R. 1915: 

Immigration in the National Interest Act of 1995

Sponsored by:  Rep. Lamar Smith [R-TX21] in the 104th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 1915, the Immigration in the National Interest Act, would have shifted the primary focus of immigration policy to spouses and minor children from extended family and to skilled immigrants from less skilled ones. It would have set a ceiling of 330,000 on family-based immigration. In addition this bill would have increased the number of skilled workers, while eliminating the unskilled worker category and the lottery program. H.R. 1915 also contained provisions designed to reduce illegal immigration such as worker verification programs.

H.R. 347: 

Immigration Moratorium Act of 1997

Sponsored by:  Rep. Robert Stump [R-AZ3, 1977-2002] in the 105th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 347, the Immigration Moratorium Act, would have helped reduce chain migration significantly by eliminating several categories of extended-family migration such as parents and adult unmarried children of U.S. citizens. It would have also reduced the ceiling for skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, eliminated the category for unskilled workers, required that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and would have ended the Visa Lottery.

H.R. 41: 

Mass Immigration Reduction Act

Sponsored by:  Rep. Robert Stump [R-AZ3, 1977-2002] in the 106th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 41, the Mass Immigration Reduction Act, called for deep reductions in all categories of immigration, including: ending the chain migration categories for parents of adult children and siblings of adults, reducing the category of skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, limiting refugee admissions and asylee adjustments to a total of 25,000 annually and requiring that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and ending the visa lottery.

H.R. 2712: 

Mass Immigration Reduction Act of 2001

Sponsored by:  Rep. Thomas “Tom” Tancredo [R-CO6, 1999-2009] in the 107th congress

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 2712, the Mass Immigration Reduction Act, called for deep reductions in all categories of immigration, including: ending chain migration categories such as parents of adult children and siblings of adults, reducing the category of skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, limiting refugee admissions and asylee adjustments to a total of 25,000 annually and require that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and ending the visa lottery. H.R.

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