H.R. 4934: 

Immigration Reduction Act of 1994

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4934, the Immigration Reduction Act, would cut legal immigration -- by reducing chain migration, ending the visa lottery, capping refugees and asylees, eliminating unnecessary worker visas, and ending birthright citizenship -- from around 1 million to around 320,000 a year, reducing U.S. population growth by about 5.8 million over a 10-year period.

H.R. 2202: 

Immigration Control and Financial Responsibility Act of 1996

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 2202, the Immigration in the National Interest Act of 1995, was a large omnibus bill designed to reform the entire immigration system. The legal immigration reforms it included were based on the bi-partisan Barbara Jordan Commission's recommendations for cutting the major links of family-chain migration and protecting American workers from further wage depression. The bill would have eliminated the categories for adult children and siblings and limited that for parents of adults.

H.R. 1915: 

Immigration in the National Interest Act of 1995

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 1915, the Immigration in the National Interest Act, would have shifted the primary focus of immigration policy to spouses and minor children from extended family and to skilled immigrants from less skilled ones. It would have set a ceiling of 330,000 on family-based immigration. In addition this bill would have increased the number of skilled workers, while eliminating the unskilled worker category and the lottery program. H.R. 1915 also contained provisions designed to reduce illegal immigration such as worker verification programs.

H.R. 347: 

Immigration Moratorium Act of 1997

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 347, the Immigration Moratorium Act, would have helped reduce chain migration significantly by eliminating several categories of extended-family migration such as parents and adult unmarried children of U.S. citizens. It would have also reduced the ceiling for skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, eliminated the category for unskilled workers, required that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and would have ended the Visa Lottery.

H.R. 41: 

Mass Immigration Reduction Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 41, the Mass Immigration Reduction Act, called for deep reductions in all categories of immigration, including: ending the chain migration categories for parents of adult children and siblings of adults, reducing the category of skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, limiting refugee admissions and asylee adjustments to a total of 25,000 annually and requiring that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and ending the visa lottery.

H.R. 2712: 

Mass Immigration Reduction Act of 2001

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 2712, the Mass Immigration Reduction Act, called for deep reductions in all categories of immigration, including: ending chain migration categories such as parents of adult children and siblings of adults, reducing the category of skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, limiting refugee admissions and asylee adjustments to a total of 25,000 annually and require that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and ending the visa lottery. H.R.

S. 2010: 

Immigration Reform Act of 2004

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 2010, the Immigration Reform Act of 2004, would: reward illegal aliens with jobs and residency, thus serving as an incentive for future illegal immigration, increase the number of family visas available in order to reduce the backlog, thereby increasing legal immigration numbers and increasing chain migration, reward certain illegal aliens with green cards and a path to U.S. citizenship, and increase the number of foreign workers legally allowed to work in the U.S. annually as well as rewarded illegal aliens with jobs.

H.R. 1954: 

Naturalization and Family Protection for Military Members Act of 2003

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 1954, the Naturalization and Family Protection for Military Members Act, would increase chain migration by allowing the spouse, child, or parent of an alien who was granted posthumous citizenship based on military service to apply for permanent resident status.

H.R. 946: 

Mass Immigration Reduction Act of 2003

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 946, the Mass Immigration Reduction Act, called for deep reductions in all categories of immigration, including: ending chain migration categories such as parents of adult children and siblings of adults, reducing the category of skilled workers to 5,000 per year from its current ceiling of 120,060 per year, limiting refugee admissions and asylee adjustments to a total of 25,000 annually and require that refugees and asylees reside legally in the United States for five years before they could apply for adjustment to permanent resident status, and ending the visa lottery. H.R.

H.R. 3938: 

Enforcement First Immigration Reform Act of 2005

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Split

H.R. 3938, the Enforcement First Immigration Reform Act, would: 1) reduce rewards for illegal immigration by prohibiting Social Security for illegal aliens, 2) reduce chain migration by eliminating the Family 4th Preference category which allots 65,000 visas each year to the siblings of adult U.S.

H.R. 4317: 

Truth in Immigration (TRIM) Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 4317, the Truth in Immigration (TRIM) Act, would require DHS to annually report to Congress on the number of illegal aliens in the United States, listed by country of residence; would reduce the total per-country level of legal immigration determined for each country by 50 percent of the number of illegal aliens from that country who were residing in the United States as of August 31 of the preceding fiscal year; and would establish the following as the order in which reductions in legal immigrant admissions would be implemented: (1) visa lottery winners; (2) U.S.

S. 2454: 

Securing America’s Borders Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 2454, the Securing America’s Borders Act, would increase chain migration through a one-time increase of 105,660 visas for exempt families of "unused" employment-based visa holders, plus a one-time increase of 115,000visas for "unused" family-preference holders, plus a permanent increase of 254,000 per year in the family-preference categories. The bill would also increase worker visas by a one-time increase of 90,000 for "unused" employment-based visas, plus a permanent increase of 754,000 employment-based visas per year, plus a permanent 100,000 increase in H-1B visas.

H.R. 2092: 

Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2005

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 2092, the Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act, would double to 960,000 the number of visas available to family-based immigrants and it would grant nonimmigrant status to any would-be family-based immigrant for whom a visa is not immediately available. It would also grant amnesty to illegal aliens who have been in the United States for the past five years, who are able to marry a U.S. citizen or permanent resident or find an employer willing to sponsor them, who are Haitian or Liberian, or who have been granted Temporary Protected Status.

H.R. 3402: 

Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 3402, the Violence Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act, would loosen the rules governing visas for victims of trafficking and domestic violence and their families, resulting in an increase in chain migration and loosen the rules governing visas for victims of trafficking and domestic violence and their families and would reward certain illegal aliens with amnesty.

S. 1033: 

Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 1033, the Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act, would: 1) increase permanent, legal immigration by adding an extra 254,000 family-based visas annually; 2) reward virtually all illegal aliens (except those with criminal records or terrorist connections) with amnesty, potentially rewarding 9 million illegal aliens; and 3) create a brand new guest worker program that would bring in 400,000 unskilled workers the first year, potentially allowing for a total increase of anywhere from 10 to 20 percent each year thereafter.

H.R. 2330: 

Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 2330, the Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act, would increase permanent, legal immigration by adding an extra 254,000 family-based visas annually, reward virtually all illegal aliens (except those with criminal records or terrorist connections) with amnesty, potentially rewarding 9 million illegal aliens with amnesty, and add an extra 150,000 employment-based visas (mostly for unskilled workers) each year. Additionally, it would create a brand new "guest" worker program that would bring in 400,000 unskilled workers the first year. Depending on how fast U.S.

S. 703: 

S. 703

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 703 would expand chain migration by expanding the definition of "immediate relative" for purposes of exemptions from the numerical cap. It would include children of U.S. citizens' parents accompanying or following them to join the parent.

H.R. 938: 

Nuclear Family Priority Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 938, the Nuclear Family Priority Act, would end chain migration by restricting allocation of family-sponsored immigrant visas so that only spouses or children of a lawful permanent resident (LPR) alien can obtain such visas. Furthermore, it would reduce the number of family-sponsored immigrant visas available per fiscal year to 88,000 minus the number of aliens who were paroled into the United States for humanitarian reasons in the second preceding fiscal year.

H.R. 878: 

Nuclear Family Priority Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

The bill would eliminate the extended family visa categories (e.g., married sons and daughters of citizens, etc.), thus ending “chain migration” as recommended by the bi-partisan Barbara Jordan Commission in 1997. Chain migration is the process where seemingly endless “chains” of foreign nationals are allowed to immigrate to the United States, since our laws allow citizens and lawful permanent residents to bring in their non-nuclear, adult family members. It is the primary mechanism that has caused legal immigration in this country to quadruple since the 1960s.

H.R. 692: 

Nuclear Family Priority Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 692, Nuclear Family Priority Act, would eliminate current green card categories for adult brothers and sisters, married and unmarried adult sons and daughters, and create a special non-working visa for parents. By not providing an increase in any other category, overall immigration would decrease by more than 111,800 per year (1.118 million a decade). The numbers would also be indirectly reduced by this bill because there would be fewer spouses or parents of U.S. citizens that would be brought into the country by immigrants.

H.R. 425: 

H.R. 425

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 425, would restrict any federal funds from being used for the “Provisional Unlawful Presence Waivers of Inadmissibility for Certain Immediate Relatives” rule published by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which allows illegal aliens to remain in the U.S. prior to leaving to process immigrant visa applications.

S. 744: 

Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 744, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act, was a massive immigration reform bill, introduced by the 'Gang of 8' that would result in approximately 30 million new permanent work permits issued in the first 10 years if passed. The bill would grant legal status and worker permits to an estimated 11 million illegal aliens with an opportunity for green cards after 10 years and replace some family-based immigration categories with a merit-based points system.

H.R. 477: 

Nuclear Family Priority Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 477, the Nuclear Family Priority Act, would eliminate the family-based green card categories that are directly responsible for endless chains of family migration. The current annual limits on green cards are 78,000 for parents, 65,000 for adult brothers and sisters, 23,400 for married sons and daughters and 23,400 for unmarried adult sons and daughters. H.R.

H.R. 15: 

Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 15, the Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act, was a massive immigration reform bill, introduced by Rep. Joe Garcia (D-Fla.) and was the House companion to the Gang of 8's S. 744. H.R. 15 would result in approximately 30 million new permanent work permits issued in the first 10 years if passed. The bill would grant legal status and worker permits to an estimated 11 million illegal aliens with an opportunity for green cards after 10 years and replace some family-based immigration categories with a merit-based points system.

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