H.R. 5742: 

Uniting Families Act of 2016

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 5742, the Uniting Families Act, would create a visa for adult children of U.S. citizen servicemen and their spouses and children. The visa would be for 5 years, be capped at 5,000 per year, and allow recipients to adjust to Legal Permanent Residents.

H.R. 5398: 

Immigration for a Competitive America Act of 2016

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Split

H.R. 5398, the Immigration for a Competitive America Act, would move some family-based green card categories to employment-based categories and lead to the quadrupling of H-1B guest-worker visas. The legislation would also mandate E-Verify and strengthen criminal penalties for employers, but would allow foreign workers to claim tax credits for their children.

H.R. 4798: 

Reuniting Families Act

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 4798, the Reuniting Families Act, would recapture unused family-based and employment based visas from 1992-2015 to help clear out the backlog of more than 4 million foreign citizens. The bill would also make massive increases to chain migration categories and codify Pres. Obama's DAPA amnesty.

S. 153: 

I-Squared Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 153, the I-Squared Act of 2015, would increase H-1B visa numbers by more than 100,000 per year and allow certain other visa holders to renew their visas. This legislation would also allow family members of H-1B holders to remain in the country and receive work permits.

H.R. 52: 

Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R.52, the Save America Comprehensive Immigration Act of 2015, would grant amnesty to 11 million illegal alien living in the United States. The legislation would also double the caps in chain migration categories, double the visa lottery, grant amnesty to foreign citizens who currently have Temporary Protected Status, and repeal any bans on funding for sanctuary cities. The legislation does include some improvements to border security.

H.R. 604: 

Nuclear Family Priority Act of 2015

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 604, the Nuclear Family Priority Act of 2015, would eliminate the latter three categories, create a special non-working visa for parents, and not provide an increase in any other category, thereby directly decreasing overall immigration by more than 111,800 per year (1.118 million a decade). This would indirectly reduce the numbers by even more over time as there would be fewer recent immigrants who are the ones most likely to bring people into the country as spouses or parents of U.S. citizens.

H.R. 4300: 

Family Unity and Employment Opportunity Immigration Act of 1990

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

H.R. 4300 was a bill to radically increase annual immigration numbers by removing or increasing limits in most immigration categories. As well, H.R. 4300 created the diversity visa lottery. Traditional American immigration had averaged around 250,000 a year until the 1980s when it dramatically rose to around 500,000. Largely as a result of H.R. 4300, annual legal immigration has risen to around 1,000,000 (one million) a year.

S. 358: 

Immigration Act of 1990

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Oppose

S. 358 was a bill to radically increase annual immigration numbers by removing or increasing limits in most immigration categories. As well, S. 358 created the diversity visa lottery. Traditional American immigration had averaged around 250,000 a year until the 1980s when it dramatically rose to around 500,000. Largely as a result of S. 358, annual legal immigration has risen to around 1,000,000 (one million) a year.

H.R. 3862: 

Immigration Moratorium Act of 1994

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R. 3862 would have cut legal immigration from around one million to below 300,000 a year -- near the traditional American level of immigration. It also would have eliminated one of the major incentives for illegal immigration by halting the granting of U.S. citizenship to babies born to illegal-alien mothers in the United States. The House leadership did not bring the bill to a vote.

H.R. 3320: 

Immigration Stabilization Act of 1993

NumbersUSA's Position:  

Support

H.R.3320 was the first comprehensive immigration reduction legislation to be introduced in the House since the 1920s. It would have cut legal immigration from around one million to just under 400,000 a year by reducing chain migration, cutting the number of employment-based green cards, reducing refugee and asylee admissions, eliminating the visa lottery, and boosting enforcement.

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