News

5th Circuit Strikes Most Lower-Court Injunctions on Texas Anti-Sanctuary Law

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A three-judge panel of Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that parts of the Texas anti-sanctuary law can take effect while the merits of the case are heard in U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia’s court. Among other things, the panel narrowed Garcia’s hold on a provision requiring law enforcement officials to honor U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainer requests. This is the highest court to date to rule on a state’s attempt to crack down on local sanctuary policies.

Blog

Ninth Circuit Chooses Politics Over National Security

Chris Chmielenski's picture

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  by  Chris Chmielenski

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld the Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) issued by Federal District Judge James Robart against Pres. Trump's Jan. 27 executive order. While the Ninth Circuit's job in this ruling was simply to decide whether the executive order was lawful and constitutional, it essentially ignored that question and based its decision on politics.

NumbersUSA News

Arpaio Lawsuit Against Obama Amnesty Wins Accelerated Hearing

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Newsmax -- Cathy Burke

Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio's lawsuit challenging President Barack Obama's sweeping orders that protect millions of illegal aliens — dismissed by a federal judge last month — is back on the front burner, with an appeals court Wednesday ordering an accelerated hearing in the constitutional case.

News

Hearing Date for States’ Anti-Amnesty Lawsuit Set for Next Week

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A federal judge has set the first hearing in the lawsuit that twenty-five states have filed to block President Obama's executive action on immigration. The suit claims that the White House overstepped its authority by granting amnesty and work permits for 5 million illegal aliens.

U.S. District Court Judge Andrew Hanen has scheduled the hearing for January 15 at 10 a.m. in Brownsville, Texas.

News

25 States Now Challenging Constitutionality of Obama’s Executive Amnesty

Tennessee flag

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Tennessee Attorney General Herb Slatery today announced his state has joined the lawsuit filed by attorneys general and governors challenging the constitutionality of President Obama’s executive amnesty. That lawsuit, now brought by 25 states, seeks a preliminary injunction to halt implementation of the president’s plans while the court considers the merits of the case.

News

Judge Questions Sheriff’s Standing to Sue Over Obama’s Executive Amnesty

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U.S. District Judge Beryl Howell listened to arguments today in a lawsuit lodged by Maricopa County, Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio that challenges the constitutionality of President Obama’s executive amnesty. The judge questioned whether Arpaio had legal standing to sue, and said she would rule on the matter soon.

News

Judge Grants Expedited Hearing in Lawsuit Seeking to Block Executive Amnesty

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Last week Judge Beryl Howell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in the case Arpaio v. Obama, et. al granted plaintiff Sheriff Joe Arpaio's request for an expedited hearing and ruling on his motion for preliminary injunction. Arpaio is seeking a preliminary injunction to prevent President Obama from implementing plans to grant three years of "deferred action" status to millions of illegal aliens.

News

Supreme Court Allows Local Ordinances to Stand

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The Supreme Court has rejected a challenge to a ruling by the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals that ultimately upholds two local immigration enforcement ordinances enacted by Fremont, Nebraska. One ordinance requires all businesses to use E-Verify, and the other requires all renters to obtain an occupancy license that can only be issued to U.S. citizens or foreign citizens who are in the country legally.

News

Long Court Battle Over Okla. Immigration-Enforcement Law Ends

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A four-year court battle between the State of Oklahoma and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce ended this week when a federal judge approved an agreement between the parties that allows the state to implement certain provisions of its immigration-enforcement law but blocks implementation of other provisions.

News

Courts Favor, Reject Efforts to Retain State Immigration Enforcement Laws

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The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in favor of continuing police immigration status checks in Arizona, while the 11th Circuit Court denied Alabama’s request to restore enforcement provisions that were blocked earlier this year. The 9th Circuit Court also took up a separate case involving Arizona law.

News

DOJ to Sue Utah Over Immigration Enforcement Law

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Last Tuesday Utah joined Arizona, South Carolina and Alabama as states being sued by the U.S Justice Department for their respective immigration enforcement laws. The U.S. Justice Department filed a lawsuit  against the state of Utah in regards to House Bill 497. The Justice Department is arguing that Utah's immigration law is unconstitutional because it overlaps federal authority, and could potentially lead to the harassment and detention of American citizens and authorized visitors. 

NumbersUSA Quoted

Strict Arizona immigration law gets Supreme Court blessing

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Roy Beck of the reform group NumbersUSA sees it as much more than that, calling the ruling "a tremendous victory for unemployed Americans."

"There are about 7 million illegal aliens estimated to be working in non-agricultural jobs. There are many Americans unemployed and lined up to get those jobs," Beck claimed.

Also supporting the ruling is the Latino advocacy group known as the League of United Latin American citizens (LULAC).

News

Supreme Court Upholds E-Verify

Supreme Court

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The Supreme Court decided 5-to-3 that states can punish employers who violate a mandatory E-Verify law. The court challenge was led by the U.S. Chamber of Congress against Arizona's 2007 law that suspends a business's license if they don't use E-Verify to check the eligibility of all new hires.

News

Documents Reveal Collusion Between Justice Department and ACLU in Arizona Lawsuit

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Documents obtained by Judicial Watch through a Freedom of Information request reveal that the Department of Justice colluded with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) while preparing its lawsuit against Arizona and the state's immigration enforcement law. Emails between the two organizations that were obtained by Judicial Watch revealed information sharing and strategy discussions.

Blog

OUR AMICUS TO SUPREME COURT (No. 2) -- Chamber Is Wrong That U.S. Law Forbids Ariz To Pull Licenses of Illegal-Alien-Hiring Biz

Roy Beck's picture

Published:  

  by  Roy Beck

Perhaps the most amazing part of the suit by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce is its claim that Arizona doesn't have the right to pull the business license of an employer that refuses to use E-Verify. Our amicus brief to the Supreme Court provides our own take on the fact that federal law specifically mentions license revocation as something states CAN do. Take a look . . .

News

13 States Urge Supreme Court to Uphold Arizona E-Verify Law

Supreme Court

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A coalition of 13 states has asked the Supreme Court to uphold an Arizona law that would suspend the business license of any company found to knowingly hire illegal aliens. The Supreme Court will hear arguments in December. Business groups are appealing a lower federal court's ruling that upheld the law.

News

U.S. 8th Circuit Court Allows Local Governments to Punish Businesses who Hire Illegal Aliens

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The U.S. 8th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that local governments can suspend the business licenses of businesses that hire illegal aliens. The case stems from a local ordinance in Valley Park, Mo. where a law was passed that requires local businesses to use E-Verify.

NumbersUSA News

Court Upholds Cuts in Aid to Noncitizens Who Are Old, Blind or Disabled

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Thousands of impoverished elderly, disabled or blind legal residents of New York State, including refugees, will be limited to $352 a month in public aid — about half of what lower courts have said they should get — under a decision by the Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court.