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Supreme Court Denies Immigration Appeals, S.C. Backs Away from Court Battle

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On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court declined appeals by Farmers Branch, Texas, and Hazleton, Pennsylvania for a hearing on their immigration-enforcement laws. Also, South Carolina agreed to a settlement that would bar enforcement of some immigration law provisions in exchange for related court challenges being dropped.

Blog

Supreme Court rulings leave plenty of room for aggressive state attrition-through-enforcement efforts

Roy Beck's picture

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  by  Roy Beck

Under today's and last year's Supreme Court rulings on Arizona laws, all states have room to aggressively pursue attrition-through-enforcement measures even if the President of the United States chooses to ignore or violate congressionally passed immigration laws.  

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Opponents of Arizona Law Plan Recourse if Supreme Court Upholds Law

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Opponents of Arizona's immigration-enforcement law are planning their strategy in case the Supreme Court upholds sections of the law. The high court listened to arguments for and against several provisions of the law in April and a decision on the case is expected by the end of June.

News

Supreme Court: Having legal-resident parents doesn't prevent deportation of adult children

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The Supreme Court decided unanimously today that the immigration status of parents can't help their adult-aged, illegal-alien children convicted of a crime. In the case Holder v. Martinez, the Court overturned a decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that ruled that Carlos Martinez Gutierrez, who had been ordered deported, couldn't use his father's status as a lawful permanent resident to stay in the country.

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Justices Not Buying Administration’s Immigration Enforcement Supremacy Bid

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  by  Van Esser

When the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week on the Arizona SB 1070 case, the Justices left little doubt that the Obama Administration’s central argument – Congress gave the feds sole authority over immigration – just didn’t hold water. The discussion focused rather on how the Arizona law might work in tandem with federal law, or possibly be in conflict. This is good news for those interested in expanding state and local government immigration enforcement efforts.

NumbersUSA News

Supreme Court: State can offer illegal immigrants reduced tuition

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The Supreme Court has upheld a California law giving illegal immigrants living there reduced in-state tuition rates at public universities, the same rates legal state residents enjoy.

The justices without comment Monday refused to accept an appeal from out-of-state students attending California schools, who said it was unfair that as U.S. citizens, they had to pay as much as $20,000 more than illegal immigrants. They claimed such "preferential treatment" violated federal law.

News

AZ Petitions Supreme Court to Lift Injunction on SB1070

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Arizona Governor Jan Brewer announced on Monday that she is petitioning the Supreme Court to lift the injunction against some of the enforcement provisions of SB1070 that were put into place by a federal district judge and upheld by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. Both courts ruled that four provisions, including one that allows police officers to check the immigration status of individuals they stop, detain, or arrest, usurps federal authority of immigration enforcement.

News

Supreme Court to Decide if Illegal Aliens can Receive In-state Tuition

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Several states, including California, Texas, and Kansas, currently allow illegal aliens to receive in-state tuition. However, the same privilege is not granted to legal Americans from out-of-state. This violates the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996, which requires that any state that gives in-state tuition to illegal aliens must give the same benefits to out-of-state students.