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The Case Against Immigration

Books - Thursday, November 29, 2007

Journalist Roy Beck vividly portrays the damaging effects of mass immigration on American workers and local communities. See the disastrous consequences of immigration not only for the coastal cities but for interior towns such as Storm Lake, Iowa, and Ashland, Alabama, and Garden City, Kansas, and Lexington, Nebraska. The 500% increase in immigration numbers has played an integral part in destroying middle-class occupations and turning them into minimum-wage jobs. The book describes many occupations where this has happened. It gives special attention to the way the immigration policy of Congress has reduced economic opportunity for black Americans, deepened the poverty of farm workers, destroyed the health of poultry plant employees and turned many construction, manufacturing and service jobs into "work Americans won't do."

by Roy Beck

Journalist Roy Beck vividly portrays the damaging effects of mass immigration on American workers and local communities.

See the disastrous consequences of immigration not only for the coastal cities but for interior towns such as Storm Lake, Iowa, and Ashland, Alabama, and Garden City, Kansas, and Lexington, Nebraska.

The 500% increase in immigration numbers has played an integral part in destroying middle-class occupations and turning them into minimum-wage jobs. The book describes many occupations where this has happened. It gives special attention to the way the immigration policy of Congress has reduced economic opportunity for black Americans, deepened the poverty of farm workers, destroyed the health of poultry plant employees and turned many construction, manufacturing and service jobs into "work Americans won't do."

Especially shocking is the detailed story of how immigration was used at the turn-of-the-last century to create the working conditions in the meatpacking industry described by Upton Sinclair in The Jungle — how the curtailment of immigration from 1925 to 1965 allowed those same jobs to become one of the safest and best-paid occupations in America — and how the new mass immigration has driven working conditions and wages right back to the Jungle level.

Using numerous, recent little-known studies published in top academic journals, the book shows the role of immigration in the 20-year decline in non-supervisory wages, the widening of income disparity and the squeezing of the middle class. And it provides a review of immigration history that shows that these have been the destructive effects of immigration every time in American history when the numbers have surged.

This is a book that changes people's minds and convinces the apathetic of the urgency for action.

by Roy Beck

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Re-Charting America's Future

Books - Thursday, November 29, 2007

If you find yourself debating immigration issues with friends, colleagues or in public arenas such as radio call-in shows, this book is made for you. Scattered throughout the book are 120 boxes, each with an argument that pro-immigrationists offer for why it would be wrong for the United States to begin to stabilize its population like the other advanced nations. Following each box are a couple of sound-bite retorts to those arguments. Then, background material is provided. Each paragraph has a citation to an expert who is the source. Arguments to which the book provides rebuttals ranges from globalism, to tradition, to economics, to diversity. Published by the Social Contract Press, 215 pages.

by Roy Beck, executive director of NumbersUSA.com

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On the Need for Reform of the H1-B Non-Immigrant Work Visa in Computer-Related Occupations

Books Studies - Friday, December 12, 2003

Congress greatly expanded the program under which skilled foreign workers may be employed in the U.S. in response to heavy pressure from industry, which claimed a desperate software labor shortage. After presenting an overview of the H-1B program, the Article will show these shortage claims are not supported by the data, then how the industry’s motivation for hiring H-1Bs is primarily a desire for cheap, compliant labor. The Article then discusses the adverse impacts of the H-1B program on various segments of the American computer-related labor force, and presents proposals for reform.

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