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A recent story in the Wall Street Journal identified states that could have fewer Representatives in the House if the 2010 census doesn't ask about citizenship status. The Constitutionally mandated count not only impacts the reapportionment in the House, but also the Electoral College.

LSU law professor John S. Baker and demographer Elliott Stonecipher called for a count of only citizens in their Wall Street Journal editorial. According to the most recent survey conducted by the American Community Survey, more than 7 percent of the nation's total population consists of non-citizens (including illegal aliens). Ten states have non-citizen populations higher than the national average, which could cause them to gain representation, while many other states could suffer.

In the article, Baker and Stonecipher referenced a quote from Census Bureau executive Dr. Elizabeth Greico who said the survey form that will be used for the 2010 census will not ask about citizenship because "Congress has not asked us to do that."

If the 2010 census doesn't ask for citizenship status, California's population of 5.6 million non-citizens would result in the Golden State keeping or gaining more than five seats in the House. Other states would have to lose seats to make up for California's win. Not only would the reapportionment impact Congressional representation, but it would also impact the electoral college for the 2012 presidential election.

Check out our map of states that will be impacted if the 2010 census counts non-citizens (including illegal aliens), and if your state could be negatively impacted, visit your Action Buffet for a fax to send to your three Members of Congress.

For more information, see the Monroe, La. News Star

Also, see a study published by the Center for Immigration Studies.

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